Mental health statistics: stress

 

Results of the Mental Health Foundation’s 2018 study

 

The study was an online poll undertaken by YouGov, and had a sample size of 4,619 respondents. This is the largest known study of stress levels in the UK.

  • In the past year, 74% of people have felt so stressed they have been overwhelmed or unable to cope.

Age differences

  • 30% of older people reported never feeling overwhelmed or unable to cope in the past year, compared to 7% of young adults.

Behavioural effects

  • 46% reported that they ate too much or ate unhealthily due to stress. 29% reported that they started drinking or increased their drinking, and 16% reported that they started smoking or increased their smoking.

Psychological effects

  • 51% of adults who felt stressed reported feeling depressed, and 61% reported feeling anxious.
  • Of the people who said they had felt stress at some point in their lives, 16% had self harmed and 32% said they had had suicidal thoughts and feelings.
  • 37% of adults who reported feeling stressed reported feeling lonely as a result.

Causes of stress

  • 36% of all adults who reported stress in the previous year cited either their own or a friend/relative’s long-term health condition as a factor. This rose to 44% of adults over 55.
  • Of those who reported feeling stressed in the past year, 22% cited debt as a stressor.
  • For people who reported high levels of stress, 12% said that feeling like they need to respond to messages instantly was a stressor.
  • 49% of 18-24 year olds who have experienced high levels of stress, felt that comparing themselves to others was a source of stress, which was higher than in any of the older age groups.
  • 36% of women who felt high levels of stress related this to their comfort with their appearance and body image, compared to 23% of men.
  • Housing worries are a key source of stress for younger people (32% of 18-24 year olds cited it as a source of stress in the past year). This is less so for older people (22% for 45-54 year olds and just 7% for over 55s).
  • Younger people have higher stress related to the pressure to succeed. 60% of 18-24 year olds and 41% of 25-34 year olds cited this, compared to 17% of 45-54s and 6% of over 55s).

Source:

https://www.mentalhealth.org.uk/statistics/mental-health-statistics-stress

Richard Hill Presents Ernest Rossi’s Mirroring Hands – A Special Workshop Event on 3rd & 4th November in London

 

The Practitioner’s Guide to Mirroring Hands:
A Client-Responsive Therapy that Facilitates
Natural Problem-solving and Mind-Body Healing
by Richard Hill and Ernest Rossi

Brochure London

 

 

 

Details and Registration:

https://www.icchp.com/course-bookings/3-pchyp-course-dates-london/22-mirroring-hands

The Unconscious: Freud’s Gift to Neuroscience

 

The idea that there’s this massive amount happening under the hood came from Freud.

 

 

 

The history of understanding that there is an unconscious that’s riding under the radar of conscious awareness is such a new idea, historically.  Several hundred years ago, people got pieces and parts of the idea, but it wasn’t until Freud that he really nailed it.

Neuroscience has drifted off a little bit from the directions that Freud was going in terms of the interpretations of whether your unconscious mind is sending you particular hidden signals and so on.  But the idea that there’s this massive amount happening under the hood, that part was correct and so Freud really nailed that.  And he lived before the blossoming of modern neuroscience, so he was able to do this just by outside observation and looking at how people acted.

Nowadays, we’re able to peer non-invasively inside people’s heads as they’re doing tasks, as they’re thinking about things and making decisions, perceiving the world. We’re able to go a lot deeper into understanding this massive machinery under the hood.

 

Source:

https://bigthink.com/in-their-own-words/the-unconscious-freuds-gift-to-neuroscience

Replacing opioids with hypnosis for pain treatment – David Spiegel

 

In health, mind matters. David Spiegel of Stanford University’s School of Medicine explains what happens in the brain when somebody is hypnotized, and how hypnosis can reduce pain, improve cancer survival rates and help people stop smoking.

 

 

Source:

http://www.weforum.org/  (courtesy of YouTube)

What does the NHS say about hypnotherapy?

 

Hypnotherapy

 

Hypnotherapy uses hypnosis to try to treat conditions or change habits.

 

What happens in a hypnotherapy session?

 

There are different types of hypnotherapy, and different ways of hypnotising someone.

First, you’ll usually have a chat with your therapist to discuss what you hope to achieve and agree what methods your therapist will use.

After this, the hypnotherapist may:

  • lead you into a deeply relaxed state
  • use your agreed methods to help you towards your goals – for example, suggesting that you don’t want to carry out a certain habit
  • gradually bring you out of the trance

You’re fully in control when under hypnosis and don’t have to take on the therapist’s suggestions if you don’t want to.

If necessary, you can bring yourself out of the hypnotic state.

Hypnosis doesn’t work if you don’t want to be hypnotised.

 

Source:

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/hypnotherapy/#

‘Mirroring Hands’

 

A special 2-day workshop on client-responsive therapy and mind-body healing – November 3rd & 4th in Central London.

The Practitioner’s Guide to Mirroring Hands: A Client-Responsive Therapy that Facilitates Natural Problem-solving and Mind-Body Healing.

 

 

Video description:

 

https://dms.licdn.com/playback

 

Workshop brochure:

 

Brochure London

 

Workshop bookings:

 

https://www.icchp.com/course-bookings

A Surprise Medical Solution: Hypnosis

 

Major hospitals are finding hypnotherapy can help sufferers of digestive conditions like heartburn, acid reflux and irritable bowel syndrome.

Experts theorize that hypnotherapy works because many gastrointestinal disorders are affected by a faulty connection between the brain and the gut, or digestive tract. The gut and brain are in constant communication. When something disrupts that communication, the brain misinterprets normal signals, which can cause the body to become hypersensitive to stimuli detected by nerves in the gut, causing pain. Experts believe hypnosis shifts the brain’s attention away from those stimuli by providing healthy suggestions about what’s going on in the gut.

 

Reference:

A Surprise Medical Solution: Hypnosis – WSJ