Mind, the mental health charity

 

What’s the difference between a psychiatrist, psychologist and psychotherapist?

 

The mental health system can sometimes feel like a maze. Trying to get the support you need can feel like an uphill battle. One of the things that makes it so difficult to navigate is this sort of language and terminology that is used, which often, no-one thinks to explain to you

 

 

For an A to Z on mental health issues and related information visit:

https://www.mind.org.uk/information-support/a-z-mental-health/

Mental Health, Sleep and Dreaming

 

People with “Maladaptive Daydreaming” spend an average of four hours a day lost in their imagination

 

Maladaptive daydreaming can interfere with normal functioning, but it’s not clear all people with the condition will want treatment

Source:

People with “Maladaptive Daydreaming” spend an average of four hours a day lost in their imagination

A Surprise Medical Solution: Hypnosis

 

Major hospitals are finding hypnotherapy can help sufferers of digestive conditions like heartburn, acid reflux and irritable bowel syndrome.

Experts theorize that hypnotherapy works because many gastrointestinal disorders are affected by a faulty connection between the brain and the gut, or digestive tract. The gut and brain are in constant communication. When something disrupts that communication, the brain misinterprets normal signals, which can cause the body to become hypersensitive to stimuli detected by nerves in the gut, causing pain. Experts believe hypnosis shifts the brain’s attention away from those stimuli by providing healthy suggestions about what’s going on in the gut.

 

Reference:

A Surprise Medical Solution: Hypnosis – WSJ

Doctors use hypnosis on needle phobic

 

 

Anaesthetists are increasingly turning to hypnosis and other relaxation techniques to help those who have a fear of needles.

Needle phobias affect as many as one in 10 people, causing significant anxiety for patients.

It also causes significant challenges for treating doctors.

To combat the challenge a small but growing number of anaesthetists have started to use hypnosis and relaxation techniques, said Dr James Griffiths, a consultant anaesthetist at Melbourne’s Royal Women’s Hospital.

“We’re finding that guided relaxation can facilitate induction of anaesthesia and it’s important that we use positive language to avoid inadvertently increasing pain or anxiety in our patients,” said Dr Griffiths.

 

Reference:

The Complementary and Natural Healthcare Council (CNHC)

 

The Complementary and Natural Healthcare Council (CNHC) were set up by the government to protect the public. They do this by providing a UK register of complementary health practitioners. Protection of the public is their sole purpose.

They set the standards that practitioners need to meet to get onto and then stay on the register. All CNHC registrants have agreed to be bound by the highest standards of conduct and have registered voluntarily. All of them are professionally trained and fully insured to practise.

They investigate complaints about alleged breaches of their Code of Conduct, Ethics and Performance. They impose disciplinary sanctions that mirror those of the statutory healthcare regulators.

They make the case to government and a wide range of organisations for the use of complementary healthcare to enhance the UK’s health and well-being. They raise awareness of complementary healthcare and seek to influence policy wherever possible to increase access to the disciplines they register.

CNHC is also the holder of an Accredited Register by the Professional Standards Authority for Health and Social Care, an independent body, accountable to the UK Parliament.

 

 

Looking for a complementary therapist? Search their register and choose with confidence. CNHC is the UK voluntary regulator across 16 complementary therapies, and they hold an accredited register approved by the PSA. Find a local, qualified practitioner here: http://ow.ly/6ZBQ30j3wCy

Coming to the Realization that You Have an Emotionally Absent Mother

 

When we become parents ourselves, most of us feel a deep connection to our own mums and dads. We feel a tremendous gratitude for all they did for us. We have a new-found appreciation for the patience, effort, and loving care it took to potty train us, help us with our maths homework, guide us through the awkward pre-teen years, and let us make our own stupid mistakes as young adults. But, for others, parenthood makes us realize that we missed out on something crucial during our childhoods – the profound emotional bond between mother and child.

 

Understanding the Pain of Abandonment

 

When children are raised with chronic loss, without the psychological or physical protection they need and certainly deserve, it is most natural for them to internalize incredible fear. Not receiving the necessary psychological or physical protection equals abandonment. And, living with repeated abandonment experiences creates toxic shame. Shame arises from the painful message implied in abandonment: “You are not important. You are not of value.” This is the pain from which people need to heal.

 

References:

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/the-many-faces-addiction/201006/understanding-the-pain-abandonment