Replacing opioids with hypnosis for pain treatment – David Spiegel

 

In health, mind matters. David Spiegel of Stanford University’s School of Medicine explains what happens in the brain when somebody is hypnotized, and how hypnosis can reduce pain, improve cancer survival rates and help people stop smoking.

 

 

Source:

http://www.weforum.org/  (courtesy of YouTube)

What does the NHS say about hypnotherapy?

 

Hypnotherapy

 

Hypnotherapy uses hypnosis to try to treat conditions or change habits.

 

What happens in a hypnotherapy session?

 

There are different types of hypnotherapy, and different ways of hypnotising someone.

First, you’ll usually have a chat with your therapist to discuss what you hope to achieve and agree what methods your therapist will use.

After this, the hypnotherapist may:

  • lead you into a deeply relaxed state
  • use your agreed methods to help you towards your goals – for example, suggesting that you don’t want to carry out a certain habit
  • gradually bring you out of the trance

You’re fully in control when under hypnosis and don’t have to take on the therapist’s suggestions if you don’t want to.

If necessary, you can bring yourself out of the hypnotic state.

Hypnosis doesn’t work if you don’t want to be hypnotised.

 

Source:

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/hypnotherapy/#

‘Mirroring Hands’

 

A special 2-day workshop on client-responsive therapy and mind-body healing – November 3rd & 4th in Central London.

The Practitioner’s Guide to Mirroring Hands: A Client-Responsive Therapy that Facilitates Natural Problem-solving and Mind-Body Healing.

 

 

Video description:

 

https://dms.licdn.com/playback

 

Workshop brochure:

 

Brochure London

 

Workshop bookings:

 

https://www.icchp.com/course-bookings

Mental Health, Sleep and Dreaming

 

People with “Maladaptive Daydreaming” spend an average of four hours a day lost in their imagination

 

Maladaptive daydreaming can interfere with normal functioning, but it’s not clear all people with the condition will want treatment

Source:

People with “Maladaptive Daydreaming” spend an average of four hours a day lost in their imagination

A Surprise Medical Solution: Hypnosis

 

Major hospitals are finding hypnotherapy can help sufferers of digestive conditions like heartburn, acid reflux and irritable bowel syndrome.

Experts theorize that hypnotherapy works because many gastrointestinal disorders are affected by a faulty connection between the brain and the gut, or digestive tract. The gut and brain are in constant communication. When something disrupts that communication, the brain misinterprets normal signals, which can cause the body to become hypersensitive to stimuli detected by nerves in the gut, causing pain. Experts believe hypnosis shifts the brain’s attention away from those stimuli by providing healthy suggestions about what’s going on in the gut.

 

Reference:

A Surprise Medical Solution: Hypnosis – WSJ

Kate Middleton reportedly uses hypnobirthing!

 

What is hypnobirthing?

 

According to the HypnoBirthing International website, expectant mothers can use ‘The Mongan Method’ to tap into their subconscious and rely on their instincts to achieve relaxation, “free of the resistance that fear creates.” This also promotes the release of endorphins, which can be essential if the birthing plan takes an unexpected turn. The result? A serene, calm and ultimately, positive experience.

 

 

References:

https://www.ajc.com/news/world/what-hypnobirthing-kate-middleton-reportedly-uses-this-special-delivery-technique/XNSY1VbFlosY0aylQzPeTM/

https://www.womenshealth.com.au/kate-middleton-hypnobirthing-third-pregnancy

Doctors use hypnosis on needle phobic

 

 

Anaesthetists are increasingly turning to hypnosis and other relaxation techniques to help those who have a fear of needles.

Needle phobias affect as many as one in 10 people, causing significant anxiety for patients.

It also causes significant challenges for treating doctors.

To combat the challenge a small but growing number of anaesthetists have started to use hypnosis and relaxation techniques, said Dr James Griffiths, a consultant anaesthetist at Melbourne’s Royal Women’s Hospital.

“We’re finding that guided relaxation can facilitate induction of anaesthesia and it’s important that we use positive language to avoid inadvertently increasing pain or anxiety in our patients,” said Dr Griffiths.

 

Reference: