Mental health statistics: stress

 

Results of the Mental Health Foundation’s 2018 study

 

The study was an online poll undertaken by YouGov, and had a sample size of 4,619 respondents. This is the largest known study of stress levels in the UK.

  • In the past year, 74% of people have felt so stressed they have been overwhelmed or unable to cope.

Age differences

  • 30% of older people reported never feeling overwhelmed or unable to cope in the past year, compared to 7% of young adults.

Behavioural effects

  • 46% reported that they ate too much or ate unhealthily due to stress. 29% reported that they started drinking or increased their drinking, and 16% reported that they started smoking or increased their smoking.

Psychological effects

  • 51% of adults who felt stressed reported feeling depressed, and 61% reported feeling anxious.
  • Of the people who said they had felt stress at some point in their lives, 16% had self harmed and 32% said they had had suicidal thoughts and feelings.
  • 37% of adults who reported feeling stressed reported feeling lonely as a result.

Causes of stress

  • 36% of all adults who reported stress in the previous year cited either their own or a friend/relative’s long-term health condition as a factor. This rose to 44% of adults over 55.
  • Of those who reported feeling stressed in the past year, 22% cited debt as a stressor.
  • For people who reported high levels of stress, 12% said that feeling like they need to respond to messages instantly was a stressor.
  • 49% of 18-24 year olds who have experienced high levels of stress, felt that comparing themselves to others was a source of stress, which was higher than in any of the older age groups.
  • 36% of women who felt high levels of stress related this to their comfort with their appearance and body image, compared to 23% of men.
  • Housing worries are a key source of stress for younger people (32% of 18-24 year olds cited it as a source of stress in the past year). This is less so for older people (22% for 45-54 year olds and just 7% for over 55s).
  • Younger people have higher stress related to the pressure to succeed. 60% of 18-24 year olds and 41% of 25-34 year olds cited this, compared to 17% of 45-54s and 6% of over 55s).

Source:

https://www.mentalhealth.org.uk/statistics/mental-health-statistics-stress

Is Yoga the foundation of modern hypnotherapy practice?

Excerpt from The Discovery of Hypnosis: The Complete Writings of James Braid

 

Ward’s “History of the Hindoos”, which they represent as facts and as special gifts imparted to them in token of the great superiority of their religious system, of inducing a state of self-hypnotism, or ecstatic trance. They produce this condition by certain postures or modes of sitting – the minds of the devotees being engaged in acts of fixed attention, by looking at some parts of their own bodies, or at inanimate or ideal [i.e., imaginary] objects; at the same time holding their breath, i.e., suppressing their respiration… I may premise, however, that whatever idea occupies the mind of the subject before he passes into the condition, or whatever may have occurred to it accidentally or through the suggestion of others subsequently, will ever after be realised, under similar combination of circumstances, in consequence of the power of suggestion and double-conscious [dissociated] memory, as manifested in some patients even in the sub-hypnotic or waking condition, when what have been called the vigilant or waking phenomena are producible; and still more certainly during the full, active, double-conscious condition.

Source:

https://www.ukhypnosis.com/2010/08/19/james-braid-on-self-hypnosis-and-hindu-yoga/

 

Savasana is a pose of total relaxation

A more traditional form of hypnosis!

 

 

Tai Chi Chuan

 

All hypnosis is self hypnosis but this is one of my favourite forms of personal practice. With a regular daily routine it is possible to increase sensitivity to not just your own energy (Chi) but the energy of others and that of the world around us. This subtle awareness can then be used as the basis of Chi Kung healing (Qi Gong), as is more commonly known with many other aspects of Traditional Chinese Medicine (like acupuncture) but without the need of a physician utilising herbal remedies, Chinese cups, Tui Na massage, or needles…