NHS therapists survey findings

 

 

Mental health statistics: stress

 

Results of the Mental Health Foundation’s 2018 study

 

The study was an online poll undertaken by YouGov, and had a sample size of 4,619 respondents. This is the largest known study of stress levels in the UK.

  • In the past year, 74% of people have felt so stressed they have been overwhelmed or unable to cope.

Age differences

  • 30% of older people reported never feeling overwhelmed or unable to cope in the past year, compared to 7% of young adults.

Behavioural effects

  • 46% reported that they ate too much or ate unhealthily due to stress. 29% reported that they started drinking or increased their drinking, and 16% reported that they started smoking or increased their smoking.

Psychological effects

  • 51% of adults who felt stressed reported feeling depressed, and 61% reported feeling anxious.
  • Of the people who said they had felt stress at some point in their lives, 16% had self harmed and 32% said they had had suicidal thoughts and feelings.
  • 37% of adults who reported feeling stressed reported feeling lonely as a result.

Causes of stress

  • 36% of all adults who reported stress in the previous year cited either their own or a friend/relative’s long-term health condition as a factor. This rose to 44% of adults over 55.
  • Of those who reported feeling stressed in the past year, 22% cited debt as a stressor.
  • For people who reported high levels of stress, 12% said that feeling like they need to respond to messages instantly was a stressor.
  • 49% of 18-24 year olds who have experienced high levels of stress, felt that comparing themselves to others was a source of stress, which was higher than in any of the older age groups.
  • 36% of women who felt high levels of stress related this to their comfort with their appearance and body image, compared to 23% of men.
  • Housing worries are a key source of stress for younger people (32% of 18-24 year olds cited it as a source of stress in the past year). This is less so for older people (22% for 45-54 year olds and just 7% for over 55s).
  • Younger people have higher stress related to the pressure to succeed. 60% of 18-24 year olds and 41% of 25-34 year olds cited this, compared to 17% of 45-54s and 6% of over 55s).

Source:

https://www.mentalhealth.org.uk/statistics/mental-health-statistics-stress

Richard Hill Presents Ernest Rossi’s Mirroring Hands – A Special Workshop Event on 3rd & 4th November in London

 

The Practitioner’s Guide to Mirroring Hands:
A Client-Responsive Therapy that Facilitates
Natural Problem-solving and Mind-Body Healing
by Richard Hill and Ernest Rossi

Brochure London

 

 

 

Details and Registration:

https://www.icchp.com/course-bookings/3-pchyp-course-dates-london/22-mirroring-hands

The Unconscious: Freud’s Gift to Neuroscience

 

The idea that there’s this massive amount happening under the hood came from Freud.

 

 

 

The history of understanding that there is an unconscious that’s riding under the radar of conscious awareness is such a new idea, historically.  Several hundred years ago, people got pieces and parts of the idea, but it wasn’t until Freud that he really nailed it.

Neuroscience has drifted off a little bit from the directions that Freud was going in terms of the interpretations of whether your unconscious mind is sending you particular hidden signals and so on.  But the idea that there’s this massive amount happening under the hood, that part was correct and so Freud really nailed that.  And he lived before the blossoming of modern neuroscience, so he was able to do this just by outside observation and looking at how people acted.

Nowadays, we’re able to peer non-invasively inside people’s heads as they’re doing tasks, as they’re thinking about things and making decisions, perceiving the world. We’re able to go a lot deeper into understanding this massive machinery under the hood.

 

Source:

https://bigthink.com/in-their-own-words/the-unconscious-freuds-gift-to-neuroscience

Replacing opioids with hypnosis for pain treatment – David Spiegel

 

In health, mind matters. David Spiegel of Stanford University’s School of Medicine explains what happens in the brain when somebody is hypnotized, and how hypnosis can reduce pain, improve cancer survival rates and help people stop smoking.

 

 

Source:

http://www.weforum.org/  (courtesy of YouTube)

What does the NHS say about hypnotherapy?

 

Hypnotherapy

 

Hypnotherapy uses hypnosis to try to treat conditions or change habits.

 

What happens in a hypnotherapy session?

 

There are different types of hypnotherapy, and different ways of hypnotising someone.

First, you’ll usually have a chat with your therapist to discuss what you hope to achieve and agree what methods your therapist will use.

After this, the hypnotherapist may:

  • lead you into a deeply relaxed state
  • use your agreed methods to help you towards your goals – for example, suggesting that you don’t want to carry out a certain habit
  • gradually bring you out of the trance

You’re fully in control when under hypnosis and don’t have to take on the therapist’s suggestions if you don’t want to.

If necessary, you can bring yourself out of the hypnotic state.

Hypnosis doesn’t work if you don’t want to be hypnotised.

 

Source:

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/hypnotherapy/#

‘Mirroring Hands’

 

A special 2-day workshop on client-responsive therapy and mind-body healing – November 3rd & 4th in Central London.

The Practitioner’s Guide to Mirroring Hands: A Client-Responsive Therapy that Facilitates Natural Problem-solving and Mind-Body Healing.

 

 

Video description:

 

https://dms.licdn.com/playback

 

Workshop brochure:

 

Brochure London

 

Workshop bookings:

 

https://www.icchp.com/course-bookings

Mind, the mental health charity

 

What’s the difference between a psychiatrist, psychologist and psychotherapist?

 

The mental health system can sometimes feel like a maze. Trying to get the support you need can feel like an uphill battle. One of the things that makes it so difficult to navigate is this sort of language and terminology that is used, which often, no-one thinks to explain to you

 

 

For an A to Z on mental health issues and related information visit:

https://www.mind.org.uk/information-support/a-z-mental-health/

What If Everything You Know About Depression Was Wrong?

 

Johann Hari always wondered if there was more to people’s depression than what was being advertised/normalized. So, he started what turned into a 4,000 mile journey to find the answer. Like many, including celebrities, Hari felt confused when it came to handling his depression. “When I was a teenager, until I went to my doctor, I had thought my depression was all in my head, meaning it was a sign of weakness, it was shameful,” he explained. “It’s not in our heads. If you’re depressed, if you’re anxious, you’re not crazy. You’re a human being with unmet needs.” Hari began to explore what really causes depression in his book Lost Connections. As a child, he was told that his depression was due to a lack of serotonin in his brain. After he was given anti-depressants, he felt better, but found that the sad thoughts began to leak back in until he went back for a higher dose. He later discovered that our moods may be product of up to nine different factors, seven of which are in our psychology and our environment. These include feeling lonely, feeling controlled at work, and not getting enough access to the natural world. He explained, “And while certainly chemical antidepressants have some value, and should remain on the table, we need to radically expand the menu of options for people who are depressed and anxious to actually deal with the deep, underlying reasons why we feel this way.”

 

Mental Health, Sleep and Dreaming

 

People with “Maladaptive Daydreaming” spend an average of four hours a day lost in their imagination

 

Maladaptive daydreaming can interfere with normal functioning, but it’s not clear all people with the condition will want treatment

Source:

People with “Maladaptive Daydreaming” spend an average of four hours a day lost in their imagination

A Surprise Medical Solution: Hypnosis

 

Major hospitals are finding hypnotherapy can help sufferers of digestive conditions like heartburn, acid reflux and irritable bowel syndrome.

Experts theorize that hypnotherapy works because many gastrointestinal disorders are affected by a faulty connection between the brain and the gut, or digestive tract. The gut and brain are in constant communication. When something disrupts that communication, the brain misinterprets normal signals, which can cause the body to become hypersensitive to stimuli detected by nerves in the gut, causing pain. Experts believe hypnosis shifts the brain’s attention away from those stimuli by providing healthy suggestions about what’s going on in the gut.

 

Reference:

A Surprise Medical Solution: Hypnosis – WSJ

Kate Middleton reportedly uses hypnobirthing!

 

What is hypnobirthing?

 

According to the HypnoBirthing International website, expectant mothers can use ‘The Mongan Method’ to tap into their subconscious and rely on their instincts to achieve relaxation, “free of the resistance that fear creates.” This also promotes the release of endorphins, which can be essential if the birthing plan takes an unexpected turn. The result? A serene, calm and ultimately, positive experience.

 

 

References:

https://www.ajc.com/news/world/what-hypnobirthing-kate-middleton-reportedly-uses-this-special-delivery-technique/XNSY1VbFlosY0aylQzPeTM/

https://www.womenshealth.com.au/kate-middleton-hypnobirthing-third-pregnancy

Doctors use hypnosis on needle phobic

 

 

Anaesthetists are increasingly turning to hypnosis and other relaxation techniques to help those who have a fear of needles.

Needle phobias affect as many as one in 10 people, causing significant anxiety for patients.

It also causes significant challenges for treating doctors.

To combat the challenge a small but growing number of anaesthetists have started to use hypnosis and relaxation techniques, said Dr James Griffiths, a consultant anaesthetist at Melbourne’s Royal Women’s Hospital.

“We’re finding that guided relaxation can facilitate induction of anaesthesia and it’s important that we use positive language to avoid inadvertently increasing pain or anxiety in our patients,” said Dr Griffiths.

 

Reference:

The Complementary and Natural Healthcare Council (CNHC)

 

The Complementary and Natural Healthcare Council (CNHC) were set up by the government to protect the public. They do this by providing a UK register of complementary health practitioners. Protection of the public is their sole purpose.

They set the standards that practitioners need to meet to get onto and then stay on the register. All CNHC registrants have agreed to be bound by the highest standards of conduct and have registered voluntarily. All of them are professionally trained and fully insured to practise.

They investigate complaints about alleged breaches of their Code of Conduct, Ethics and Performance. They impose disciplinary sanctions that mirror those of the statutory healthcare regulators.

They make the case to government and a wide range of organisations for the use of complementary healthcare to enhance the UK’s health and well-being. They raise awareness of complementary healthcare and seek to influence policy wherever possible to increase access to the disciplines they register.

CNHC is also the holder of an Accredited Register by the Professional Standards Authority for Health and Social Care, an independent body, accountable to the UK Parliament.

 

 

Looking for a complementary therapist? Search their register and choose with confidence. CNHC is the UK voluntary regulator across 16 complementary therapies, and they hold an accredited register approved by the PSA. Find a local, qualified practitioner here: http://ow.ly/6ZBQ30j3wCy

Ericksonian Hypnotherapy Monthly Masterclass

 

Hello Everyone,

We have now finalised our third meetup established at Birkbeck, University of London with easy access to transport amenities.

Our group is open to anyone interested in Ericksonian Hypnotherapy. Moreover, all skill levels are welcomed. This monthly meetup was created to discuss anything Ericksonian and more complex casework examples found in clinical practice, when utilising Ericksonian hypo-therapeutic principles and techniques.

It may also count towards your annual CPD as qualified hypnotherapists registered with a professional body. This is a not for profit event but a minimal fee of approximately £20 will be charged for the day for a 3 hour seminar and only to cover the hire costs of our Central London venue which is now confirmed.

25 places on this instance are available and Dan Jones will be the respected guest speaker presenting on the day.

I look forward to meeting you all!

With best wishes

Tony

Ericksonian Hypnotherapy Monthly Masterclass

Saturday, Apr 28, 2018, 1:00 PM

7 Members Went

Check out this Meetup →

Coming to the Realization that You Have an Emotionally Absent Mother

 

When we become parents ourselves, most of us feel a deep connection to our own mums and dads. We feel a tremendous gratitude for all they did for us. We have a new-found appreciation for the patience, effort, and loving care it took to potty train us, help us with our maths homework, guide us through the awkward pre-teen years, and let us make our own stupid mistakes as young adults. But, for others, parenthood makes us realize that we missed out on something crucial during our childhoods – the profound emotional bond between mother and child.

 

Understanding the Pain of Abandonment

 

When children are raised with chronic loss, without the psychological or physical protection they need and certainly deserve, it is most natural for them to internalize incredible fear. Not receiving the necessary psychological or physical protection equals abandonment. And, living with repeated abandonment experiences creates toxic shame. Shame arises from the painful message implied in abandonment: “You are not important. You are not of value.” This is the pain from which people need to heal.

 

References:

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/the-many-faces-addiction/201006/understanding-the-pain-abandonment

Northampton General Hospital has published a self-help hypnosis programme for people feeling anxious before medical procedures.

 

LISTEN: Self-help hypnosis podcast published by Northampton hospital for patients with pre-operation anxiety

 

CachedImage.axd

 

https://www.northamptonchron.co.uk/news/listen-self-help-hypnosis-podcast-published-by-northampton-hospital-for-patients-with-pre-operation-anxiety-1-8423648

Ericksonian Hypnotherapy Monthly Masterclass

 

Hello Everyone,

We have now finalised our meetup established at Birkbeck, University of London with easy access to transport amenities.

Our group is open to anyone interested in Ericksonian Hypnotherapy. Moreover, all skill levels are welcomed. This monthly meetup was created to discuss anything Ericksonian and more complex casework examples found in clinical practice, when utilising Ericksonian hypo-therapeutic principles and techniques.

It may also count towards your annual CPD as qualified hypnotherapists registered with a professional body. This is a not for profit event but a minimal fee of approximately £20 will be charged for the day for a 3 hour seminar and only to cover the hire costs of our Central London venue which is now confirmed.

25 places on this first instance are available and Dan Jones will be the respected guest speaker presenting on the day.

I look forward to meeting you all!

With best wishes

Tony

Ericksonian Hypnotherapy Monthly Masterclass

Saturday, Mar 24, 2018, 1:00 PM

11 Members Went

Check out this Meetup →

Teaching patients in pain self hypnosis could help curb the opioid crisis, Stanford researcher says

 

David Spiegel of Stanford University’s School of Medicine explains what happens in the brain when somebody is hypnotized, and how hypnosis can reduce pain, improve cancer survival rates and help people stop smoking.

 

 

Source:

https://scopeblog.stanford.edu/2018/03/02/could-hypnosis-help-curb-the-opioid-crisis-quite-possibly-says-stanford-researcher/

 

World’s First Deep Brain Surgery Using Hypnosis Instead Of Anaesthetic

 

Surgeons have completed the world’s first deep brain surgery using hypnosis instead of an anaesthetic to control the patient’s pain.

Doctors carried out the deep brain stimulation procedure to cure the 73-year-old patient’s severe trembling hands.

In the procedure, the brain regions which are responsible for the tremor were electrically stimulated, causing the tremor to be effectively suppressed so the patient can for example eat and write again undisturbed. As fine electrodes are implanted directly deep into the brain, they are often referred to as “brain pacemakers”.

The 73-year-old patient from Thuringia, Germany, whose tremor did not adequately improve with medication, is reportedly very satisfied with the result of the six-hour operation by the team from the University Hospital of Jena.

Normally, such medical interventions are done with anaesthesia. But the sedative effect of anaesthesia “can lead to distorted results” said Dr Rupert Reichart, head of the neurosurgery department. He said: “Under hypnosis there are no such side-effects of anaesthesia. “This is an enormous advantage to check whether the activation of the electrodes is successful.”

During the surgery a team of anaesthetists was on standby. The clinic is one of the few centres in Germany offering deep brain stimulation, conducting about twelve such operations per year.

Dr Reichart provided the required speech hypnosis during the procedure and kept the patient in hypnosis during the entire operation, while colleague Dr Walter carried out the actual procedure.

Another doctor, Tino Prell, monitored the success of the procedure during the operation and after awakening the patient, who was not named in reports, from hypnosis. Dr Prell said: “This procedure allows a so-far unprecedented check on the effect of the deep brain stimulation and thus a clearly better and targeted electrode installation than in the usual procedures under narcosis.”

Dr Reichart emphasised that the hypnosis “has nothing to do with esotericism or tricks of pendulum-swinging TV magicians.” He said: “Of course, such a method cannot be used with all patients. “But patients who do not tolerate anaesthesia, for example, can benefit from it – if they are hypnotic.”

Dr Reichart acquired the necessary expertise in medical hypnosis at the Medical University of Vienna. He is one of the few neurosurgeons in Germany with this additional qualification.

Source:

https://www.nationalhypnotherapysociety.org/news/world-s-first-deep-brain-surgery-using-hypnosis-instead-of-anaesthetic/